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I write emotions

It was quite long time back, one summer of my juvenile years, when I wrote my first poem. It was on the drying leaf of a small poplar tree that stood in the garden of my house. I do not remember what I wrote, for I had no inkling by then that I would prefer ink and paper over posh jobs and banknotes. I wrote those few lines and gave it to the river that whizzled past by hundred meters ahead. 

I did not know much about poetry even then and I have never been bothered to know about the standing forms of poetry ever, except for my academic pursuits. Poetry to me is emotion first and imagery later. A wind in any form is a wind first. A flower in all its genesis is first a flower irrespective of its varieties and vagaries. I cherish the treasure of all wonderful poets and their works time has brought to us. I keep them close to my heart. But, as a poet, I respond to a new age of poetry. Poetry that touches the core of your hearts with even a pair of words. Even without rhythm, meter or rhyme. I believe we are moving ahead of the age of blank verse, too. And I somehow feel emotions would compose themselves like never before. And I sense that emotions have always been a strong reason behind every poetic work.


Perhaps, like many species of plants and animals, some forms of emotions are already extinct. You won't find them in the newer generations. And probably hence, it is high time, emotions claim their right place into our hearts and ink.

(abridged)

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